Charlotte Initiative

The Charlotte Initiative for Permanent Acquisition of eBooks by Academic Libraries

Related Presentations

Overview & Environmental Scan

November 4, 2016
Presenter: October Ivins, Ivins eContent Solutions

These slides relate the project's progress as of November, 2016. It includes updates from each of the research teams as well as an overview of the project's status as a whole.

The Charlotte Initiative on eBook Principles: Making eBooks Work for Libraries and Publishers

June 18, 2016, Association of American University Presses
Chair: October Ivins, Ivins eContent Solutions
Panelists: Theresa Liedtka, Dean UTC Library, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga; Elizabeth Siler, Collection Development Librarian, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Respondents: Steve Cohn, Director, Duke University Press; John McLeod, Director of the Office of Scholarly Publishing Services, University of North Carolina Press

Join us for a mid-project update about this Mellon-funded exploration seeking common ground between publishers and librarians about eBook concerns. Libraries want unlimited simultaneous use and to provide course use and instructional materials. What business models can accommodate that need? What licensing terms are feasible to provide perpetual access and archival rights without DRM? How does ILL fit into the picture? Members of the working group representing the course use and licensing principles research teams will make brief presentations and invite you to participate in what is sure to be a lively discussion.

eBook Wars: The Libraries Awaken.

June 3, 2016, Society for Scholarly Publishing
Presented by Rachel Frick and October Ivins

While some suggest renting eBook collections is the new library status quo, others espouse more traditional values tied to curating collections for the long term and ensuring perpetual access to content. Increased reliance on intermediaries has obscured the long-standing value proposition libraries and publishers share. Building digital collections for networked distribution provides a unique opportunity to join librarians and publishers in common goals.

Two speakers will describe their projects and opportunities for engagement. Funded by the Mellon Foundation, the Charlotte Initiative for Permanent Acquisitions of eBooks by Academic Libraries involves representatives from libraries, library consortia, and university presses. It addresses licensing principles, preservation, UX and course use of eBooks. Supported by the IMLS and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Digital Public Library of America is working with library partners to investigate a national eBook strategy that includes a community shared national eBook marketplace, distribution platform and a universal open eBook collection that is optimized for mobile use.

Making eBooks Functional, Publisher Backing for the Charlotte Initiative.

May 17, 2016, ACRL & Choice Webinar
Presented by Chuck Hamaker, October Ivins, and Wouter van der Velde

UNC Charlotte recently introduced the Charlotte Initiative on eBook principles, pressing eBook providers to adopt an approach that ensures permanent access to content, allows unlimited concurrent use, and removes digital rights management restrictions. This webinar features an in-depth overview of the project by Principal Investigator Chuck Hamaker and explores its benefits for academic institutions. Insights will be provided on the current eBook landscape, licensing terms, the impact of DRM, and classroom and instruction use. As the most prolific publisher of eBooks globally, Springer Nature will also weigh in with its support of the initiative and give details about how to take it further with liberal use policies including ILL provisions, the addition of substantial humanities publishing, and affordable textbook support.

Ebooks Research and Advocacy Panel

April 14, 2016, DPLAfest 2016
Moderator: Rachel Frick
Panelists: Alison Bradley, Michael Blackwell, Colin Rogister

The Charlotte Initiative is a Mellon funded two-year research and planning grant, based at UNC Charlotte, that will produce recommendations for the licensing and acquisition of electronic resources, particularly eBooks. Working groups will be convened to discuss, define, and investigate the impact on institutions of three principles for eBook licenses: unlimited simultaneous users, No Digital Rights Management (DRM) either contractual or technical, irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights.

Which Publishers and Vendors Will License eBooks for Maximum Usability?

April 4, 2016, Electronic Resources and Libraries Conference
Presented by Chuck Hamaker and October Ivins

A two-year Mellon Foundation funded project explores proposes three principles:

  • Unlimited simultaneous users
  • No Digital Rights Management (DRM)
  • Irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights

This update will share preliminary findings of the environmental scan.

How Do We Study Satisfaction With Academic eBook Collections?

Nov. 7, 2015, Charleston Conference
Presented by Alison Bradley and Beth Caruso

Much of the existing literature on patron satisfaction with eBooks in academic settings does not differentiate between platforms, formats, and other conditions that drastically change the user’s ability to read, annotate, and use eBook content.

The Charlotte Initiative is a project funded by the Mellon Foundation to convene a working group that investigates principles for permanent acquisition of eBooks for academic libraries. As part of this project, a user experience research team has been created to review the existing literature on patron satisfaction with multiple aspects of eBooks.

During summer 2015, this research team began a meta-study to determine areas of the user experience with eBooks in academic libraries that have been studied comprehensively and to identify areas that have not received formal evaluation. In this article, we not only convey the results of our research team’s literature review but also the critical questions that surface from the initial two-day meeting of the Charlotte Initiative working group. We also provide criteria that librarians and institutions can use to guide assessments of user experience with eBooks in academic library settings.

The Charlotte Initiative on eBook Principles: A Mellon Funded Project -- Q&A Session for Publishers, Aggregators and Librarians.

Nov. 6, 2015, Charleston Conference
Presented by October Ivins

Principal Investigator Chuck Hamaker and the UNC Charlotte based project team have assembled a Working Group of twenty participants representing library consortia, publishers, content aggregators, and academic libraries. In this session I’ll give an overview of the project and describe the scope of the publisher and vendor environmental scan. Please come with your questions and ideas.

As a Mellon supported project, our focus is the humanities and humanistic social sciences. We will discuss, define and investigate the impact on academic institutions of three principles for eBook licenses:

  • Unlimited simultaneous users
  • No Digital Rights Management (DRM) either contractual or technological
  • Irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights

We have formed three research teams to explore licensing terms, user experience and the impact of DRM, and classroom and instruction use. The fourth component is an iterative environmental scan of the eBook market, which is a major part of my role as Project Consultant. We will share information throughout the remaining 18 months of effort. The project will conclude with a free conference in Charlotte in Spring 2017.