Charlotte Initiative

The Charlotte Initiative for Permanent Acquisition of eBooks by Academic Libraries

Charlotte Initiative Environmental Scan Publisher Survey

This version is provided as a preview and for interested parties who will not receive survey invitations. The actual survey is interactive and employs radio buttons, logic, and comments options. It is accessible only by invitation. If you are a publisher interested in responding and have not received an invitation, please contact Project Consultant October Ivins at october.ivins@mindspring.com. You may download a PDF version of the survey or view it on this page.


The Charlotte Initiative is a Mellon-funded project to investigate the state of the Academic eBook Market. We hope you will participate in the following survey that will gather information about current business models for selling eBooks to academic libraries.

I recognize this is an area where policies and practices are continuing to evolve. Please use your general knowledge to respond to these questions. It is not necessary to look up license terms unless you would prefer to do so.

This is an iterative project and I welcome an ongoing dialogue with participants including publishers, vendors, and libraries. This means that I will follow up to learn what activities would promote support for the requested licensing principles.

1. Please provide the total number of eBooks you produced in the last complete fiscal year or publication year. (your choice)

2. Please provide the number of eBooks into these categories using the definitions provided.

Please select the best match for the terminology you use. If it is difficult to provide exact numbers, please provide an estimate. Each category is an independent subset of the total number, so feel free to include the same titles in multiple categories if appropriate.

a. Scholarly and professional (Books intended for academic, scholarly, or professional audience)

b. Course Adoptions (Please estimate how many "Scholarly and Professional" titles you would consider to have the potential to be adopted as supplemental textbooks in college classes.)

c. Textbooks (Books designed as textbooks, not scholarly books that may become course adoptions. Course adoptions are created as Scholarly and professional.)

d. Trade or general interest (Books intended for a general reader or alumni, such as campus or regional histories, cookbooks, and other non-academic books)

e. Revised editions (Books from categories a, b, and c that are revised and designated as a revised edition)

3. If you publish eBooks that do not fit into the designated categories above, please tell us about them.

4. If you distribute other publications within your organization that manage negotiations with academic libraries independently, please provide the name of the publishing unit and contact information for the appropriate person here.

5. Do you sell eBooks to academic libraries, either directly or through vendors?

a. Yes [This choice skips to question 8.]

b. No [This choice advances to questions 6 and 7, then to a final comment.]

6. Please explain why you do not sell eBooks to academic libraries. (Comment box.)

7. Since you do not sell eBooks to academic libraries, do you have future plans to do so?

a. Yes

b. No

c. Undecided

There are no remaining questions for publishers who do not sell eBooks to academic libraries. There is one more general question before exiting.

8. In which of the following ways do you sell eBooks to academic libraries? Please select all that apply.

a. Through aggregators, in packages

b. Through aggregators, single titles

c. Direct to libraries, packages of our own titles

d. Direct to libraries, single titles

9. Direct sale: Which of these principles is your organization or firm willing to allow? That is, will you or have you already granted these terms under existing licenses? (Possible answers are Yes; Under Consideration; No, but have received requests; No, but have not received requests.)

a. Unlimited simultaneous users

b. No Digital Rights Management (DRM) - including, but not limited to, use of proprietary formats, restricted access to content, or time-limited access terms.

c. Irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights - including the rights for libraries to host and preserve digital copies of their licensed collections.

10. Direct sale: If your response to all three terms is not "Yes," please explain. Please note if your response might be different if dealing directly with a library or library consortium.

11. Vendor Sales: If you sell to libraries through vendors and aggregators, which terms do your vendors support? (Possible answers are Yes; Under consideration; No, but have received requests; No.)

a. Unlimited simultaneous users

b. No Digital Rights Management (DRM) - including, but not limited to, use of proprietary formats, restricted access to content, or time-limited access terms.

c. Irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights - including the rights for libraries to host and preserve digital copies of their licensed collections.

12. Vendor Sales: If your response to all three terms is not "Yes," are you interested in discussing changes to these policies with your vendor(s)? Please explain. 

13. Do you allow Interlibrary Loan for eBooks? If you have different terms for different eBooks or types of eBooks, please select all that apply.

a. Yes. Chapter level only; Downloading permitted

b. Yes. Entire eBook; Downloading permitted

c. Yes. Chapter level only, but not for downloading

d. Yes. Entire eBook, but not for downloading

e. No, but do provide Short Term Loan to borrowing library

Comments are welcome.

14. If you publish textbooks, are you willing to negotiate with the campus library on access and pricing terms?

a. Yes

b. No

15. Do you have different policies for eBooks that are potential course adoption or course use titles? Please check all that apply.

a. Exclude from packages

b. Individual title sale

c. Willing to negotiate sales and licensing directly with libraries

Please explain other policies or actions.

16. Do you have different policies for eBooks that are potential crossover, trade titles? Please check all that apply.

a. Exclude from packages

b. Individual title sale

c. Willing to negotiate sales and licensing directly with libraries

Please explain other policies or actions.

17. Do you apply other policies or practices to any other category or categories of eBooks not already addressed? Please explain. (Optional)

18. Please tell us which vendors offer your eBooks to US and Canadian academic libraries.

a. Cambridge UP

b. Coutts (directly for you, not through an aggregator)

c. deGruyter 

d. EBSCO (NetLibrary)

e. JSTOR

f. OVID (Wolters Kluwer)

g. Oxford UP (UPSO)

h. Project MUSE (UPCC)

i. ProQuest (Ebrary, EBL, MyiLibrary)

j. YBP (directly for you, not through an aggregator)

k. Other (please add)

19. Please indicate the business terms corresponding to our three principles your vendors provide for your eBooks. Please select all that apply. (For instance, you may allow only allow single users for one price and multiple simultaneous users for a higher price with the same vendor; in that case, checking both Yes and No on Unlimited Simultaneous Users would be appropriate.) [Table of Possible answers: Unlimited simultaneous users (Yes, No, Don’t know); No DRM (Yes, No, Don’t know); Irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights (Yes, No, Don’t know)]

a. Cambridge UP

b. Coutts (direct)

c. DeGruyter

d. EBSCO (NetLibrary)

e. JSTOR

f. OVID (Wolters Kluwer)

g. Oxford UP (UPSO)

h. Project MUSE (UPCC)

i. ProQuest (Ebrary, EBL, MyiLibrary)

j. YBP (direct)

k. Other for US and Canadian academic libraries (Please add)

Comments

20. Under what circumstances would you (or have you) removed an eBook from sale to academic libraries?

21. If you archive eBooks directly or via an aggregator partner, what service is used?

a. CLOCKSS

b. Hathi Trust

c. Portico

d. Other or Self (Please explain and name the platform if this is not programmed locally.)

22. Please explain if there are other categories of eBooks, for instance, local interest titles, guidebooks, first book monographs, etc., that have different policies than those described in the rest of the survey.

23. Please provide any additional comments you think we should consider. We are especially interested in learning about innovative business models to create sustainable ways to support the three Charlotte Principles (perpetual access and archival rights; unlimited simultaneous users; and freedom from DRM) and/or interlibrary loan issues.

24. This concludes our questions. Please let us know of any questions you may have for us now, or you may contact October Ivins directly at october.ivins@mindspring.com.